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Explore

Missions beyond Mars

Exploration of the outer planets requires extreme patience. Our launch vehicles are no powerful enough to send massive spacecraft directly to the giant planets, so they must take circuitous paths returning to Earth or even traveling inward to Venus for gravity assists to boost momentum enough to send them beyond the asteroid belt. Rendezvousing with asteroids and comets can be even more challenging; they lack sufficient mass to brake fast-moving spacecraft into orbit, so the ships must perform years of orbit adjustment to match position and velocity with the tiniest worlds.

Power is also a problem.  Located very far from the Sun, comets, outer planets, and most asteroids receive very little solar energy. Solar arrays must be very large to gather the little sunlight, like those of Rosetta, Dawn, and Juno; or else spacecraft must carry radioisotope thermoelectric generators. The successes of missions like Voyager, Pioneer, Galileo, Cassini-Huygens, and New Horizons require these nuclear power supplies, but Earth has run short of refined plutonium-238, preventing us from planning future missions.

The exceptions to these rules are the missions to near-Earth asteroids, which, by definition, have orbits very similar to our own planet's, permitting them to be explored relatively cheaply and quickly by solar-powered spacecraft like Hayabusa and NEAR. And sometimes, small craft like Deep Impact and Stardust can catch comets as they speed across the inner solar system.

Active missions: Voyager 1 - Voyager 2International Cometary Explorer (ICE) - Rosetta and Philae - Cassini/Huygens -  New Horizons - Dawn - Juno

Past missions: Pioneer 10 - Pioneer 11Vega 1 - Vega 2 - Sakigake - Suisei - Giotto - Galileo - UlyssesNear Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) - Deep Space 1 - Stardust - Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) - Hayabusa (MUSES-C) - Deep Impact

Active missions

Juno [DEPRECATED]
Juno

Future Jupiter polar orbiter

NASA
Launch: August 5, 2011
Jupiter arrival: Planned for July 4, 2016

Following a lengthy cruise and October 2013 Earth flyby, Juno will survey Jupiter from a polar orbit, carrying a suite of instruments designed to study the planet's interior. It will investigate the existence of an ice-rock core; determine the amount of global water and ammonia present in the atmosphere; study convection and deep wind profiles in the atmosphere; investigate the origin of the jovian magnetic field; and explore the polar magnetosphere. Its science mission does not require a camera, but it does carry one, specifically designed to capture unusual and beautiful views of Jupiter from its unusual polar perspective for public pleasure.

LINKS: Blog posts about Juno - NSSDC - Wikipedia - NASA - Mission Juno (SWRI)

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Dawn in Orbit
Dawn

Asteroid 4 Vesta and dwarf planet 1 Ceres orbiter

NASA
Launch: September 27, 2007
Vesta arrival: July 16, 2011
Ceres arrival: February 2015

After flying past Mars on February 4, 2009, Dawn crept up on asteroid 4 Vesta, becoming the first orbiter of a main-belt asteroid.  After surveying the asteroid from many altitudes, Dawn will depart Vesta in the summer of 2012, embarking on a journey to end with orbit insertion at 1 Ceres in August 2014.

LINKS: Blog posts about Dawn - NSSDC - Wikipedia - JPL - UnmannedSpaceflight

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New Horizons at Pluto and Charon
New Horizons

Jupiter and Pluto / Kuiper Belt flyby

NASA
Launch: January 19, 2006
Jupiter flyby: January-May, 2007
Pluto encounter: January-August 2015, close approach July 14

New Horizons is the result of a long battle to take advantage of a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for a Jupiter gravity assist trajectory to Pluto. It observed Jupiter over five months around the flyby in early 2007, with its closest approach on February 27. It was the first spacecraft to observe the newly formed Little Red Spot, and also caught Io's north polar volcano Tvashtar in the middle of a spectacular eruption.  It will travel within 10,000 kilometers of Pluto before traveling onward to a second (and probably much more distant) encouter with a much smaller Kuiper belt object.

LINKS: Blog posts about New Horizons - NSSDC - Wikipedia - NASA - JHUAPLUnmannedSpaceflight

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Rosetta and Philae
Rosetta and Philae

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko orbiter and lander

ESA
Launch: March 2, 2004
Churyumov-Gerasimenko arrival: May 2014

Rosetta's original goal was comet 46P/Wirtanen, but launch delays required a rerouting to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The route is long, involving three Earth flybys (in 2005, 2007, and 2009) and one Mars flyby (February 25, 2007). It flew by asteroid 2867 Steins on September 5, 2008 and 21 Lutetia on July 10, 2010.  Its long cruise will take it nearly to Jupiter's orbit before it travels inward again to rendezvous with the comet.  Since Rosetta is solar-powered, ESA had to place it into a state of deep hibernation for this most distant period of its cruise.  Rosetta went to sleep on June 8, 2011 and will not wake up again until January 20, 2014, five months before its arrival at Churyumov-Gerasimenko.  After entering orbit, it will drop, a small lander, Philae, to the surface of the comet.

LINKS: Blog posts about Rosetta and Philae - NSSDC (Rosetta) - NSSDC (Philae)Wikipedia (Rosetta) - Wikipedia (Philae)ESA

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Cassini-Huygens at Saturn
Cassini-Huygens

Successful Saturn orbiter & Titan probe

NASA / ESA / ASI
Launch: October 15, 1997
Jupiter flyby: December 30, 2000
Orbit insertion: July 1, 2004
Huygens probe descent: January 14, 2005

Cassini-Huygens' path to Saturn required two flybys of Venus (on April 26, 1998, and June 24, 1999), one of Earth (on August 18, 1999), and one of Jupiter (on December 30, 2010).  During the Jupiter encounter, Cassini conducted coordinated observations with Galileo.  The Huygens probe descent was wildly successful, revealing a strange new world of channels and basins on Titan.  Cassini shapes its orbit around Saturn with numerous gravity-assist flybys of Titan, occasionally surveying Saturn from above or below (with lovely perspectives on the rings) and occasionally from within the ring plane (affording frequent encounters with Saturn's other, smaller moons). Cassini's mission has been extended twice, but it will end on September 15, 2017, after 293 complete orbits of Saturn with the spacecraft's plunge into the atmosphere.

LINKS: Blog posts about Cassini-Huygens - NSSDC (Cassini) - NSSDC (Huygens)Wikipedia - JPL - ESA - UnmannedSpaceflight

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International Cometary Explorer
International Cometary Explorer (ICE)

Comet Giacobini-Zinner flyby and distant Halley observer

(Formerly known as International Sun-Earth Explorer or ISEE-3)
NASA
Launch: August 12, 1978
Flyby: September 11, 1985
Return to Earth: expected August 10, 2014

Originally launched to explore Earth's magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind, the International Sun-Earth Explorer was renamed the International Cometary Explorer on December 22, 1983. On that date, a lunar gravity assist flyby launched the spacecraft onto a heliocentric orbit ahead of Earth to intercept comet Giacobini-Zinner. It flew through the tail of Giacobini-Zinner on September 11, 1985, and went on to transit between the Sun and Halley's comet in March 1986, becoming the first spacecraft to investigate two comets.  There was no contact with ICE after the end of its mission in 1999 until September 18, 2008, when it was successfully re-contacted. ICE will return to fly by the Moon on August 10, 2014, when it could be re-captured into a halo orbit and possibly sent out again to explore another comet.

LINKS: Blog posts about ICE - NSSDC - Wikipedia - GSFC

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Voyager 2 in the solar wind
Voyager 1

Successful Flybys of Jupiter and Saturn

Launch: September 5, 1977
Jupiter encounter: January 4 to April 13, 1979
Saturn encounter: August 23 to December 15, 1980

Launched 16 days after Voyager 2, Voyager 1 was on the fast track to Jupiter and actually arrived four months ahead of the other spacecraft. Voyager 1 flew by Jupiter on March 5, 1979, taking more than 18,000 images of planet and its moons. The spacecraft flew by Saturn on November 12, 1980, coming within 64,200 kilometers of the planet's cloud tops. During the flyby, the spacecraft took almost 16,000 images of Saturn, its moons, and ring system. Voyager 2's path past Saturn and Titan directed it up and out of the plane of the ecliptic, allowing scientists to get an overhead view of the planet and rings. Voyager 1 is currently on an Interstellar Mission and is the most distant man-made object ever launched, taking that title from Pioneer 10 on February 17, 1998.  It is now probing the boundaries of the heliosphere, where the solar system gives way to the interstellar medium.

LINKS: Blog posts about Voyager 1 - NSSDC - Wikipedia - JPL

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Voyager 2 in the solar wind
Voyager 2

Successful “Grand Tour” flybys of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

NASA
Launch: August 20, 1977
Jupiter encounter: April 25 to August 5, 1979
Saturn encounter: June 5 to September 5, 1981
Uranus encounter: November 4, 1985 to February 25, 1986
Neptune encounter: June 5 through October 2, 1989

Even though Voyager 2 launched 16 days before Voyager 1, it took its time getting to Jupiter and arrived four months after Voyager 1. Ten months into the flight, well before the spacecraft reached the planet, Voyager 2's primary radio receiver failed. The backup receiver kicked in, but it proved to be somewhat unreliable. Controllers tried to revive the primary receiver, without any luck.  They were forced to continue with the backup. Despite its irregularities, the backup receiver worked admirably during the Jupiter fly by. Voyager 2 flew by Jupiter on July 9, 1979, taking about the same number of images as Voyager 1 (18,000 images of Jupiter and its moons). Between the two spacecraft, three new moons were discovered as well as a thin, dark ring around Jupiter. Voyager images of Jupiter's moon Io revealed active volcanoes, the first ever discovered on another body besides Earth.  Voyager 2 passed by the ringed world on August 26, 1981. It flew within 41,000 kilometers of the planet's cloud tops and provided scientists with almost 16,000 images of the planet, its moons and rings. While at Saturn, the two Voyager spacecraft discovered three new moons of Saturn, the intricate structure and spoke-like features of the ring system, and information about the planet's atmosphere and magnetic field.  Voyager 2 flew by Uranus on January 24, 1986, coming within 81,500 kilometers of the planet's cloud tops. The spacecraft took almost 8,000 images of the planet, its moons and its dark ring system. The planet itself appeared as a vague, nearly featureless ball covered by a greenish blue methane haze.  Although Voyager 2 performed a survey of Uranus’ moons, it passed by when tilted Uranus was at the height of southern summer, meaning that only the moons’ southern hemispheres were visible.  Voyager 2 had to pass very close by Uranus to get the gravity assist necessary to send it on to Neptune.  The close flyby altitude, combined with the vertical, “bull’s-eye” pattern of Uranus’ tilted system of rings and moons, meant that Voyager 2 saw only Miranda close-up; the rest of the moons were seen only distantly. The Voyager 2 images yielded the discoveries of 10 new moons. Voyager 2 flew by Neptune on August 25, 1989. Since Neptune was the final target for the spacecraft, scientists decided they could take risks they had avoided during previous planetary encounters. They programmed Voyager 2 to fly within 5,000 kilometers of the planet's cloud tops, closer than it had come to Jupiter, Saturn, or Uranus. The results were impressive. Even at such a great distance from the Sun, the 4-hour time lag in communications and low lighting conditions, the spacecraft returned 10,000 images of Neptune, its moons, and ring system. Voyager 2 discovered interesting cloud features on the planet and recorded some of the fastest winds in the solar system. The spacecraft also discovered the clumpiness of Neptune’s rings, as well as six new moons.  The close approach to Neptune actually slowed Voyager 2’s speed with respect to the Sun, and sent the spacecraft on a trajectory diving below the plane of the solar system. Like Voyager 1, it is now probing the boundaries of the heliosphere, where the solar system gives way to the interstellar medium.

LINKS: Blog posts about Voyager 2 - NSSDC - Wikipedia - JPL

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Past missions

Deep Impact
Deep Impact

Flyby and impact into comet 9P/Tempel 1

NASA
Launch: January 12, 2005
Tempel 1 impact and flyby: July 4, 2005
Hartley 2 flyby: November 4, 2010
Last heard from: August 8, 2013

One day prior to its flyby of Tempel 1, Deep Impact released a 364-kilogram copper impactor onto a collision course with the comet.  The impactor captured images all the way down to its 10.2 kilometer-per-second  impact with Tempel 1.  The flyby spacecraft captured amazing views of the impact from a safe distance as every large telescope on Earth was also pointed at the comet.  Since the end of its primary mission, Deep Impact's blurred camera has been employed to study exoplanets (a project called the EPOXI mission), and the spacecraft has encountered a second comet, 103P/Hartley 2.  The spacecraft is low on fuel but otherwise still functional and now being tested for future use as a deep-space astronomical observatory.  It was then targeted for a 2020 flyby of asteroid (163249) 2002GT, but contact was lost after August 8, 2013.

LINKS: Blog posts about Deep Impact - NSSDC (EPOXI) - NSSDC (Impactor) -  Wikipedia - UMD

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Hayabusa (MUSES-C)

Orbiter and sample return from asteroid Itokawa (1998 SF36)

ISAS/JAXA
Launch: May 9, 2003
Itokawa arrival: September 2005
Earth sample return: June 13, 2010

Hayabusa's mission to and from asteroid Itokawa was one of the most thrilling adventures in modern space exploration, marked by numerous near-mission-ending disasters saved by the ingenuity of mission engineers, and culminating in the fiery death of the parent spacecraft on the night of the return of its sample capsule -- a story much too long for this space (and dramatic enough to be the subject of three feature-length films in Japan).  Hayabusa rendezvoused with and touched down on a very small asteroid.  It deployed a hopper named "Minerva" on November 12, 2005, but the hopper missed the asteroid. It did successfully drop a target marker containing 880,000 names to the surface, and then followed the marker down for two landing attempts. Upon the successful return of the sample capsule, a very small amount of asteroid dust was found inside, plenty for analysis by labs trained on the Stardust samples.

LINKS: Blog posts about Hayabusa - NSSDC -  Wikipedia - JAXA

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Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR)

Failed multi-comet flyby

NASA
Launch: July 3, 2002

CONTOUR was lost August 15, 2002, when the spacecraft failed to contact Earth shortly after a scheduled firing of its main rocket motor. Investigation revealed that the spacecraft broke apart toward the end of the rocket motor firing.  The spacecraft had been scheduled to fly by at least three comets: comet 2P/Encke in 2003, continuing with 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann in 2006, and 6P/d'Arrest in 2008.

LINKS: NSSDC -  Wikipedia - NASA

Stardust

Flyby and coma sample return from comet P/Wild 2

NASA
Launch: February 7, 1999
Annefrank flyby: October 31, 2002
Wild 2 flyby: January 2, 2004
Sample return: January 15, 2006
Tempel 1 flyby: February 15, 2011
Propellant exhausted: March 24, 2011

Stardust flew past Earth on November 14, 2000, and then asteroid 5535 Annefrank.  When Stardust flew by Wild 2, it collected samples of dust and volatiles from the comet's coma as well as images and other data. Other objectives of the mission included collecting samples of interstellar dust grains, imaging the comet nucleus, and conducting preliminary analysis of the composition of the cometary dust particles. It returned the samples to Earth on January 15, 2006. The aerogel collector plates proved to be full of cometary material, surpassing the science team's expectations. Following another Earth flyby on January 14, 2009, Stardust was sent onward to comet 9P/Tempel 1, which had been the target of the Deep Impact mission.  With nearly no fuel left onboard, Stardust was commanded to burn the rest of it to depletion before powering down for good.

LINKS: Blog posts about Stardust - NSSDC (Stardust/NExT) - NSSDC (Sample Return Capsule) -  Wikipedia - JPL

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Deep Space 1

Flybys of asteroid 9969 Braille and comet 19P/Borrelly

NASA
Launch: October 24, 1998
Braille flyby: July 28, 1999
Borrelly flyby: September 22, 2001
Engine shut down: December 18, 2001

Deep Space 1 was a demonstration probe designed to test new technologies such as ion propulsion. The spacecraft flew by asteroid 9969 Braille, which was named through a Planetary Society-run contest, within 15 kilometers of the asteroid's surface. With all systems still operating at the end of its primary mission in September 1999, engineers decided to extend the mission and attempt a flyby of comet 19P/Borrelly. By the time Deep Space 1 reached Borrelly, it had lasted three times longer than expected. It flew within 2,200 kilometers of the comet, providing the most detailed images of a comet's nucleus yet seen. With its fuel almost gone and its instruments in varying states of disrepair, communication with the spacecraft was terminated in December 2001.  However, the spacecraft could, in theory, be re-contacted and returned to service, as ICE was.

LINKS: NSSDC -  Wikipedia - JPL

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Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)

Asteroid 433 Eros orbiter (eventually used as a lander!)

NASA
Launch: February 17, 1996
Eros arrival: February 14, 2000
Eros landing: February 12, 2001
End of mission: February 28, 2001

During its yearlong mission, NEAR gathered 10 times more data than originally planned.  On February 12, 2001, with its fuel and funding nearly depleted, mission planners tried the unprecedented maneuver of landing the orbiter on Eros. With fragile solar panels and protruding antennae, NEAR was never intended to be a lander. However, controllers successfully brought the spacecraft to a gentle 1.9 meter-per-second touchdown onto the rocky surface, taking 69 images during the final descent. The spacecraft continued to function even after it landed. NEAR was officially shut down on February 28, 2001.

LINKS: NSSDC -  Wikipedia - JPL

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Ulysses

Successful Solar polar orbiter

NASA
Launch: October 6, 1990
Jupiter flyby: February 8, 1992
Mission end: June 30, 2009

The primary mission of Ulysses was to study the north and south pole of the Sun. However, getting to those solar poles required the spacecraft to perform some interplanetary gymnastics. The spacecraft first went to Jupiter, where the strong Jovian gravity helped redirect the spacecraft, placing it on its proper course. As Ulysses flew by the planet, instruments onboard the spacecraft studied Jupiter's strong magnetic field and radiation levels.  The mission was long and productive, ending only in 2008 after the X-band transmitter failed and the fuel had nearly frozen.

LINKS: Blog posts about Ulysses - NSSDC -  Wikipedia - JPL

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Galileo

Jupiter orbiter, with flybys of asteroids 951 Gaspra and 243 Ida/Dactyl

NASA
Launch: October 18, 1989
Gaspra flyby: October 29, 1991
Ida/Dactyl flyby: August 28, 1993
Witnessed Shoemaker-Levy crash: July 1994
Jupiter probe descent: December 7, 1995
Jupiter orbit insertion: December 8, 1995
Plunge into Jupiter: September 22, 2003

After a long and troubled development process culminating with a launch from Space Shuttle Atlantis, Galileo traveled past Venus once (on February 10, 1990) and Earth twice (on December 8, 1992 and August 28, 1993).  But it had suffered a crippling malfunction early in its mission when its high-gain antenna failed to open. Still, Galileo accomplished the first ever asteroid flybys as it traveled through the main belt on its way to Jupiter.  It passed within 1,600 kilometers of Gaspra and 2,400 kilometers of Ida.  Galileo made the surprising discovery that Ida has a tiny satellite, which was later named Dactyl.  As Galileo approached its insertion into Jupiter orbit, it happened to be the right place in the right time to observe comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 break up and crash into Jupiter.  Galileo was the only observatory that had a direct view of the impact, which happened on Jupiter’s night side; Earth-based telescopes had to wait until Jupiter’s rotation brought the impact zone into view hours later.  Galileo was the first spacecraft to deploy a probe into an outer planet’s atmosphere.  When the Jupiter Probe plunged into the Jovian clouds, it sent back information about the temperature, wind speeds, and pressure as it descended. It finally succumbed to the incredible pressure (24 times Earth's pressure at sea level) one hour after it began its descent.  Galileo was also the first spacecraft to dwell in a giant planet's magnetosphere long enough to identify its global structure and investigate the dynamics of Jupiter's magnetic field. It revealed that Jupiter's ring system is formed by dust kicked up as interplanetary meteoroids smash into the planet's four small inner moons and that the planet's outermost ring is actually two rings, one embedded within the other.  The spacecraft’s mission was extended three times in order to study the Galilean satellites Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.  Galileo made many discoveries about these moons: Io's extensive volcanic activity is 100 times greater than that found on Earth; Europa harbors a salty ocean up to 100 kilometers (62 miles) underneath its frozen surface, containing about twice as much water as all the Earth's oceans; Callisto and Ganymede may also feature a liquid-saltwater layer; and Ganymede has an iron core, like Earth, and a magnetic field, making this moon the first satellite known to possess a magnetic field.  In order to avoid any possibility of the spacecraft contaminating Europa’s salty ocean with material brought from Earth, the spacecraft was deliberately destroyed by sending it onto a collision course with Jupiter.

LINKS: Blog posts about Galileo - NSSDC -  Wikipedia - JPL

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Giotto

Comets 1P/Halley and 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup flyby

ESA
Launch: July 2, 1985
Halley flyby: March 13, 1986
Grigg-Skjellerup flyby: July 10, 1992
End of mission: July 23, 1992

Giotto flew by Halley at a distance 596 kilometers. All experiments performed well and returned a wealth of new scientific results, of which perhaps the most important was the clear identification of the cometary nucleus. During an extended mission, the spacecraft successfully encountered comet Grigg-Skjellerup at a distance of 200 kilometers.

LINKS: Blog posts about Giotto - NSSDC -  Wikipedia - ESA

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Suisei

Comet 1P/Halley flyby

Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science (ISAS)
Launch: March 18, 1985
Flyby: March 8, 1986
Fuel depleted: February 22, 1991

Suisei (which translates to ‘Comet') was identical to Sakigake apart from its payload: an ultraviolet (UV) imaging system and a solar wind instrument. Suisei began UV observations in November 1985, generating up to 6 images per day. The spacecraft encountered Comet 1P/Halley at a distance of 151,000 kilometers. ISAS had decided during 1987 to guide Suisei to a November 24, 1998 encounter with 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, but due to depletion of the hydrazine, this, as well as plans to fly within several million kilometers of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle on February 28, 1998, were cancelled.

LINKS: NSSDC -  Wikipedia - JAXA

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Sakigake

Comet 1P/Halley flyby

Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science (ISAS)
Launch: January 8, 1985
Flyby: March 11, 1986
Contact lost: November 15, 1995

Sakigake (which translates to 'Pioneer') was a prototype spacecraft launched by the Japanese space agency ISAS. It successfully flew within 7 million kilometers of Halley's comet. The spacecraft was equipped with 3 instruments to measure plasma wave spectra, solar wind ions, and interplanetary magnetic fields. An extended mission was planned, including flybys of comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova in 1996 and comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner in 1998.  Unfortunately, controllers lost contact with the spacecraft.

LINKS: NSSDC -  Wikipedia - JAXA

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Vega 1 and Vega 2

Comet 1P/Halley flybys

Soviet Academy of Sciences
Launch: December 15 and 21, 1984
Flyby: March 6 and 9, 1986

The identical Vega 1 and Vega 2 combined Venus swingbys with flybys of comet 1P/Halley.  It is estimated that Vega 1 flew by at a distance of 10,000 kilometers (6,000 miles), and Vega 2 at 3,000 kilometers (1,800 miles).

LINKS: Blog posts about Vega - NSSDC (Vega 1) - NSSDC (Vega 2)Wikipedia (Vega 1) - Wikipedia (Vega 2) - IKI

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Pioneer 11

Successful Jupiter and Saturn flyby

NASA
Launch: April 5, 1973
Jupiter flyby: December 2, 1974

Pioneer 11 was the second spacecraft to explore the outer solar system (the first being Pioneer 10). Pioneer 11 flew within 34,000 kilometers (21,100 miles) of the Jovian cloud tops. The spacecraft studied the planet's magnetic field and atmosphere and took pictures of the planet and some of its moons. It then flew by Saturn on September 1, 1979 and continued on out of the solar system. Instruments were finally shut down on September 9, 1995, when there was no longer enough power.

LINKS: Blog posts about Pioneer 11 - NSSDC - Wikipedia

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Pioneer 10

Successful Jupiter flyby

NASA
Launch: March 2, 1972
Jupiter flyby: December 3, 1973

Pioneer 10 was the first spacecraft to pass through the Asteroid Belt and explore the outer solar system. It flew within 200,000 kilometers of the Jovian cloud tops. Scientists were surprised at the tremendous radiation levels experienced by the spacecraft as it passed the gas giant planet. Once past Jupiter, the spacecraft headed out of the solar system. Routine communication with Pioneer 10 ended on March 31, 1997, but controllers occasionally checked in with it until contact was lost on April 28, 2001.  It is now heading in the general direction of Aldebaran, the red giant star in the constellation of Taurus. At its current speed, it would take about 2 million years to get to Aldebaran.

LINKS: Blog posts about Pioneer 10 - NSSDC - Wikipedia

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