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Emily Lakdawalla

Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla (2017, alternate)

Emily Lakdawalla

Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist

blog@planetary.org
+1-626-793-5100

Extended bio and head shots

Emily Lakdawalla is a passionate advocate for the exploration of all of the worlds of our solar system. Through blogs, photos, videos, podcasts, print articles, Twitter, and any other medium she can put her hand to, Emily shares the adventure of space exploration with the world.

Emily holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in geology from Amherst College and a Master of Science degree in planetary geology from Brown University. She came to The Planetary Society in 2001 to oversee a portion of the Society's Red Rover Goes to Mars project, an education and public outreach program on the Mars Exploration Rover mission funded by LEGO. She has been writing and editing the Planetary Society Blog since 2005, reporting on space news, explaining planetary science, and sharing beautiful space photos. She appears weekly on the Society's Planetary Radio podcast, answering listener questions or rounding up the latest space news from the blog.

Emily has been an Administrator of the forum UnmannedSpaceflight.com since 2005, supporting a worldwide community of amateur space image processors. She is also a contributing editor to Sky & Telescope magazine.

She is now writing her first book, tentatively titled Curiosity Rover: Design, Planning, and Field Geology on Mars, due out from Springer-Praxis in 2018. The book will explain the development, design, mission, and science of Curiosity with the same level of technical detail that she delivers in the Planetary Society Blog.

Emily can be reached at blog@planetary.org or @elakdawalla on Twitter.

Latest Blog Posts

OSIRIS-REx Earth flyby: What to Expect

September 19, 2017

OSIRIS-REx launched on September 8, 2016. Now, a year later, it's returning to its home to get a second boost on to its destination, the asteroid Bennu. It'll test all its cameras on Earth and the Moon in the 10 days after the flyby.

Cassini: The dying of the light

September 15, 2017

Cassini is no more. At 10:31 according to its own clock, its thrusters could no longer hold its radio antenna pointed at Earth, and it turned away. A minute later, it vaporized in Saturn’s atmosphere. Its atoms are part of Saturn now.

Curiosity update, sols 1726-1813: Surveying Vera Rubin Ridge from below

September 13, 2017

Curiosity had a productive three months driving along the front of Vera Rubin Ridge, gathering photos and data with its arm instruments, finally driving up on to the ridge on sol 1809.

What to expect during Cassini's final hours

September 11, 2017

A timeline of what to expect from the great mission during its final hours.

Curiosity's balky drill: The problem and solutions

September 06, 2017

Since December 1, 2016, Curiosity has been unable to drill into rocks because of a serious problem with one of the drill's motors. Emily Lakdawalla thoroughly explains the issues and the path forward for Curiosity.

Voyager 40th anniversary: Reflecting on the pale blue dot

September 05, 2017

Today is the 40th anniversary of the launch of Voyager 1. Four decades later, both spacecraft survive, still producing science, still working on their interstellar missions. On the occasion of the anniversary, we revisit Carl Sagan's reflections on the significance of the Voyager missions.

Book Update: The Design and Engineering of Curiosity

September 01, 2017

Emily Lakdawalla's first book is now available for pre-order.

Voyager 40th anniversary: The Planetary Report's chronicles

August 25, 2017

In honor of the 40th anniversary of the Voyager missions, we're making publicly available seven back issues of The Planetary Report that chronicled the grand tour of the giant planets.

Latest Processed Space Images

Enceladus near the end

September 15, 2017

As it prepared to end its mission, Cassini spent its last day looking at some favorite targets, including Enceladus. This is a natural color composite of red, green, and blue-filter images but was made with uncalibrated data, so the color may not be correct.

Iapetus moving out of eclipse

September 10, 2017

This 8-frame animation shows Iapetus at nearly full phase, passing out of the shadow cast by Saturn and/or its rings on the moon on February 14, 2007.

Iapetus in false color

September 10, 2017

This is a raw, unprocessed, uncalibrated image captured on December 27, 2004 as Cassini approached Iapetus from a distance of 762,036 kilometers (473,507 miles). It is composited of three views captured through ultraviolet, green, and infrared filters to bring out compositional variations across the sunlit hemisphere of Iapetus. Three huge impact basins are visible in this image, including a giant multiringed structure within the dark region on the left. A sharp, linear ridge crosses the center of the disk, looking like a conical mountain that pokes up from Iapetus's limb on the right.

astronaut on Phobos
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