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Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla

Emily Lakdawalla

Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist

blog@planetary.org
+1-626-793-5100

Extended bio
Appearance calendar
and head shots

Emily Lakdawalla is a passionate advocate for the exploration of all of the worlds of our solar system. Through blogs, photos, videos, podcasts, print articles, Twitter, and any other medium she can put her hand to, Emily shares the adventure of space exploration with the world.

Emily holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in geology from Amherst College and a Master of Science degree in planetary geology from Brown University. She came to The Planetary Society in 2001 to oversee a portion of the Society's Red Rover Goes to Mars project, an education and public outreach program on the Mars Exploration Rover mission funded by LEGO. She has been writing and editing the Planetary Society Blog since 2005, reporting on space news, explaining planetary science, and sharing beautiful space photos. She appears weekly on the Society's Planetary Radio podcast, answering listener questions or rounding up the latest space news from the blog.

Emily has been an Administrator of the forum UnmannedSpaceflight.com since 2005, supporting a worldwide community of amateur space image processors. She is also a contributing editor to Sky & Telescope magazine.

She is now writing her first book, tentatively titled Curiosity Rover: Design, Planning, and Field Geology on Mars, due out from Springer-Praxis in 2017. The book will explain the development, design, mission, and science of Curiosity with the same level of technical detail that she delivers in the Planetary Society Blog.

Emily can be reached at blog@planetary.org or @elakdawalla on Twitter.

Latest Blog Posts

Rosetta is gone

Posted 2016/09/30 08:13 CDT | 4 comments

Today there is one less spacecraft returning science data from beyond Earth. The European Space Operations Centre received the final transmission from Rosetta at 11:19 September 30, UT.

Rosetta spacecraft may be dying, but Rosetta science will go on

Posted 2016/09/29 12:47 CDT | 3 comments

The Rosetta mission will end tomorrow when the spacecraft impacts the comet. ESA took advantage of the presence of hundreds of members of the media to put on a showcase of Rosetta science. If there’s one thing I learned today from all the science presentations, it’s this: Rosetta data will be informing scientific work for decades to come.

OSIRIS-REx’s cameras see first light

Posted 2016/09/29 03:34 CDT | 0 comment

As OSIRIS-REx speeds away from Earth, it’s been turning on and testing out its various engineering functions and science instruments. Proof of happy instrument status has come from several cameras, including the star tracker, MapCam, and StowCam.

Rosetta end-of-mission event schedule

Posted 2016/09/27 11:45 CDT | 3 comments

A schedule of what to expect during Rosetta's final hours September 29 and 30, and how you can follow online.

Juno and Marble Movie update at Apojove 1

Posted 2016/09/22 12:51 CDT | 4 comments

Juno is on its second of two long orbits around Jupiter, reaching apojove (its farthest distance from the planet) today.

Where to find rapidly released space image data

Posted 2016/09/21 07:06 CDT | 1 comment

Interested in playing with recent space image data? Here's a list of places to get the freshest photos from space.

Some beautiful new (old) views of Neptune and Triton

Posted 2016/09/20 02:40 CDT | 4 comments

Beautiful new amateur work with 27-year-old Voyager data.

Successful launch for China's Tiangong-2 space station

Posted 2016/09/15 09:37 CDT | 0 comment

Today, China launched its second modular space station, Tiangong 2.

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

JunoCam's

JunoCam's "Marble Movie" frames, July 10-August 21, 2016

Posted 2016/08/25 | 0 comments

During its first long orbit around Jupiter, JunoCam took color photos of the planet every 15 to 30 minutes, seeing it spin, watching the red spot, and observing moons and moon shadows crossing the disk. Access the raw data for all these images here.

Thirteen Curiosity drill holes on Mars

Thirteen Curiosity drill holes on Mars

Posted 2016/08/11 | 0 comments

As of August 2016, Curiosity has drilled and sampled at thirteen locations on Mars. They are (left to right and top to bottom): John Klein, drilled on sol 182; Cumberland, on sol 279; Windjana, on sol 621; Confidence Hills, on sol 759, Mojave, on sol 882; Telegraph Peak, on sol 908; Buckskin, on sol 1060; Big Sky, on sol 1119; Greenhorn, on sol 1137; Lubango, on sol 1320; Okoruso, sol 1332, Oudam, sol 1361; and Marimba, sol 1422. All of these images were taken with the MAHLI camera on the end of the arm from a distance of about 5 centimeters. The drill holes are 1.6 centimeters wide.

3D route map for Curiosity: Across the Bagnold dune field, sols 1153-1417

3D route map for Curiosity: Across the Bagnold dune field, sols 1153-1417

Posted 2016/08/11 | 0 comments

A wide view of Curiosity's future traverse. At full resolution it is 1 meter per pixel. North is about 7 degrees to the left of up. Murray Buttes are at the left of the image, and the dark swath is the Bagnold dune field. Curiosity's route is based on mapping by Phil Stooke.

More pictures processed by Emily Lakdawalla »

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